Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)

Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)

The most famous cannabinoid of all is delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, more commonly known as
THC. In addition to the recreational feeling of ‘getting high’, THC is also responsible for many of the
medicinal effects of cannabis. This includes, among others, reduction of nausea, vomiting, pain and
muscle spasms, and improvement of sleep and appetite.

THC is one of many chemical compounds known as cannabinoids found inside the dried resin glands of the female cannabis flower. In the plant’s raw form, THC is found as an acid rather than the psychoactive we have come to know and love. Male cannabis plants also produce mild amounts of THC, but typically not enough to interest most people.

Tetrahydrocannabinol is the principal psychoactive constituent (or cannabinoid) of cannabis. The pharmaceutical formulation dronabinol, is available by prescription in the U.S. and Canada. It can be a clear, amber or gold colored glassy solid when cold, which becomes viscous and sticky if warmed.
The most famous cannabinoid of all is delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, more commonly known as THC. In addition to the recreational feeling of ‘getting high’, THC is also responsible for many of the medicinal effects of cannabis. This includes, among others, reduction of nausea, vomiting, pain and muscle spasms, and improvement of sleep and appetite

Like most pharmacologically-active secondary metabolites of plants, THC in Cannabis is assumed to be involved in self-defense, perhaps against herbivores.[8] THC also possesses high UV-B (280–315 nm) absorption properties, which, it has been speculated, could protect the plant from harmful UV radiation exposure.

THC, along with its double bond isomers and their stereoisomers, is one of only three cannabinoids scheduled by the UN Convention on Psychotropic Substances (the other two are dimethylheptylpyran and parahexyl). It was listed under Schedule I in 1971, but reclassified to Schedule II in 1991 following a recommendation from the WHO. Based on subsequent studies, the WHO has recommended the reclassification to the less-stringent Schedule III.

Cannabis as a plant is scheduled by the Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs (Schedule I and IV). It is specifically still listed under Schedule I by US federal law[13] under the Controlled Substances Act signed by the US Congress in 1970.

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